Happy Ever After – A sneaky peek…

With Happy Ever After ready to go back to my editor I thought I’d give you a sneak peek at the story and its setting.

The blurb…

Kate and Neil Spence met at Circular Quay after the Hiroshima Day march in August 1985. Kate was marching, Neil was not. It was love almost at first sight.

And they all lived happily ever after…or did they?

Over thirty years have passed, their children have grown and Kate and Neil have gone from being happily married to being happily separated. That is until Neil asks for a divorce – and another wedding brings up feelings that both had thought were long gone.

What’s it about?

Happy Ever After is a love story, but more than that it’s a story about love. It’s a story about how love changes, grows and is challenged over the years. It’s about the curve balls life throws us just when we’re ready to begin realising our dreams. It’s about living the better or for worse and richer and poorer thing and it’s about coming out the other side. It’s about family, friends, second, third and even fourth chances for a happy ever after. Mostly though, it’s about love.

The setting…

Happy Ever After is set mostly on Sydney’s north shore. We also visit Queenstown and the Milford Track – in the rain when the mountains look like they’re crying silvery streams of tears.

A starring role goes to my favourite tree in Sydney’s Botanical Gardens. It’s the Moreton Bay Fig that sits above the Opera House. From here you can see across to Fort Denison. I’ve eaten many a sandwich under the shade of that tree.

Where did the idea come from?

I was listening to some of my old protest style music from the mid 80’s while I was cooking one Saturday afternoon– songs by Goanna and Shane Howard, Redgum and Midnight Oil.  The music took me back to my first year at uni. Although I wasn’t involved in student politics, there was a rumour going around that Midnight Oil might be playing at the end of the annual Hiroshima Day march. So I marched…well, sort of. To be honest, it started off as a lark but got a tad boring and I bailed out about halfway down George Street.

Not that it mattered – Midnight Oil weren’t there. They were touring the US at the time. I got to see them later that year at a Wilderness Society concert for the Daintree Rainforest.

Of course, these days rumours like that couldn’t get properly started, but back then we didn’t have social media, the internet or mobile phones. Back then it was harder to stay in touch if you fell out of it. I had fun having Kate find coins and a pay phone to call and let her parents know she’d be home late.

Anyways, it started with the music and, just a week later Happy Ever After became my 2017 NanoWrimo project.

Happy Ever After will be published later this year. Sign up to my newsletter for publication dates and pre-order deals.

 

 

An interview with…Samantha Wood

 

Last week I went all out and brought you an interview with me. This week I’m talking to someone who isn’t me – and yes, I’m aware of just how that sounds!

So, without further ado, allow me to introduce you to Samantha Wood. Her novel Bay of Shadows is available now and, spoiler alert, we share an editor…

Ok, so we can get to know each other a little better, do you have a specific genre that you write in?

Ooh, tricky one. My first book was a travel memoir, but this one is ‘gothic noir’, which sounds decidedly mysterious. My readers have called it a psychological thriller – I quite like the sound of that!

Do you have a day job? If so, how do you manage or schedule your writing around it?

I do have a day job, but I’ve been on long service leave for three months now so it feels like a lifetime ago. I work remotely for a company called Access Innovation Media – they provide captioning for television and live events so that the Deaf and hard of hearing can have access to content. I come from a Deaf family so it’s really special to be involved in the bigger picture, so to speak. (And I get to work from home in my trackies.) It’s a struggle to schedule my writing around full-time work but somehow I manage, even if it’s only a few words here and there.

Where do you write? Office, coffee shop, all of the above?

Well, I moved my office lock, stock and barrel into the garage – which also doubles as my pottery studio – but whenever I’m in Melbourne I love to haunt the State Library of Victoria. I think it’s the smell of all those old books – it is like catnip for us authors! There is so much inspiration in that beautiful place. I write most of my notes in coffee shops or outdoors – anywhere or anytime ideas strike.

What about notes? Are you old school – eg journals or manual notes – or new, ie digital?

I’m old school when it comes to notes. I also have a slight obsession with notebooks so have about six on the go at any one time. They all have different purposes: blog notes, marketing schedules, story ideas; they’re also a good way of posting my progress – or lack thereof – on Instagram for whatever project I may be working on at the time.

What made you decide to go indie?

I got sick of waiting! I’d finished the manuscript for THE BAY OF SHADOWS back in April 2016, did a big mail-out to publishers and agents alike, then waited. And waited…and waited. I got a few responses from different publishing houses saying they loved the story and would get back to me in due course. By November of that year I still hadn’t heard back from anyone so, on a suggestion from my wonderful editor, I went down the indie road, and never looked back.

What has been your biggest learning so far?

Absolutely everything! When I published late last year I had no idea about author platforms or marketing strategies – I didn’t even know what SEO stood for. The past six months have been a monumental learning curve and while it has been exhausting at times, it has been a wild ride.

Any regrets? Things you wish that you’d known or would have done differently?

Probably that I waited so long to do this, although having said that, nothing happens until the timing is right. I had the mind-set that being traditionally published was the only way to go, but going down the indie route has given me so much freedom to do things my way – from the cover design of THE BAY OF SHADOWS to the design of my website and my social media platforms; I don’t think I would have found my voice as an author if I’d secured a publishing deal from the outset. As someone mentioned to me years ago, “That’s my name on the shingle above the door,” and they were right. As an author I’m a brand so I know how best to represent myself. (And maybe I’m a secret control freak after all!)

What about your team? Do you use the same team each time?

I use the same team every time for one very important reason: they are AMAZING! Nicola O’Shea has been my editor for many years and apart from being one of the best editors anywhere, she is also a beautiful human being. Keith Stevenson does the formatting for all my books, and is also exceptional. They can both be found at ebookedit. Xou Creative did my wonderful cover design and I have all my proofreading done by Pauline at In The Garret Writing Services. My friend Mark Flores at Falcon Creative does all my video production.

Plotter or pantser?

Pantser, definitely a pantser. I wish I was a plotter – they seem to have it far more together than I do.

Your desk – messy or neat? Care to share a photo?

Ah, somewhere in between. See the insulation at the back is a lovely touch.

Coffee or tea…or something else?

Coffee – as my Instagram page will attest – so so much coffee.

Music? Or do you prefer to work in silence?

I love music but I’m so easily distracted that it has to be silence. I’d even started putting in my earplugs but that was the kind of silence that was so absolute that you start to wonder if you’re still alive! The garage is down the bottom of the garden so it’s really quiet down there.

What are you working on right now?

I’m working on the rewrite of my next novel UNDER TEN THOUSAND STARS which is going back to my editor in August. I’ve had a couple of weeks away from it so I can’t wait to get stuck back in. Wish me luck!

Good luck…and thank you!

Bay of Shadows is available now on Amazon.

If you want to know more about Samantha and her books, you can find her here:

Samantha’s website

Samantha on Facebook

Samantha on Instagram

If you want to know more about Samantha’s team:

Ebookedit

Falcon Creative 

Xou Creative 

Pauline @ In the Garret Writing and Editorial Services – paulineprivate5@gmail.com

An interview…with me!

Over the next few months – or longer – I’ll be bringing you interviews with other indie authors or indie publishers. To get the ball rolling, I figured I’d interview myself!

 Ok, so we can get to know each other a little better, do you have a specific genre that you write in?

Absolutely…chick lit…women’s fiction…call it what you will.

Do you have a day job? If so, how do you manage or schedule your writing around it?

I do. I remotely work back to Sydney. I’m part-time, so 3 days a week I’m on spread-sheets and processes, and the other 2 days (plus whatever time I can grab on a weekend) I have for fiction. I make the absolute most of that time.

When I lived in Sydney and was working in the city 4 days a week, I’d get up at 5am and write for 45mins before I had to get ready for work – and then again every night. It all feels so much more balanced now.

Where do you write? Office, coffee shop, all of the above?

I write in my home office, sitting up in bed (promise you won’t tell my chiropractor), and also down at our local surf club at least one afternoon a week. Why wouldn’t you with this view.

What about notes? Are you old school – eg journals or manual notes – or new, ie digital?

For notes, I keep a journal that I write messily in. I’m in the process of organising my notes into bullet journal format (I wrote about that here) – and that, I think, is going to change my life #notexaggerating

What made you decide to go indie?

I’ve written about that before – you can find the post here. Essentially it boils down to creative control. Thinking about recently when I trashed my novel and decided to turn it into 3 novelettes, there’s no way a traditional publisher who had accepted my original pitch would have allowed me to do what I’m doing.

My next projects are a huge departure from what I’ve done before too – being an indie gives me the ability to take my career in the direction that I want it to go – for better or for worse.

What has been your biggest learning so far?

This whole thing has been a huge learning curve, but my biggest takeaway is that indie publishing is absolutely not about overnight success. I thought I knew that, but I’m not sure that I knew it…if you know what I mean.

Any regrets? Things you wish that you’d known or would have done differently?

No regrets. They don’t work (to quote Robbie Williams). The thing I wish I knew? Just how important an email list and social media platform is.

What about your team? Do you use the same team each time?

I do. I use Nicola O’Shea for my editorial work, and Keith Stevenson for formatting. You can find them at ebookedit. I also use the same cover designer – Jacinda May.

Plotter or pantser?

Pantser, although, for my next project (no spoiler alert) I’m going to need to learn how to plot…at least a little…

 Your desk – messy or neat? Care to share a photo?

I’m trying to be neat at present. My office is right near the front door, so visible to anyone coming into our house. Plus, I’m juggling partition with creative work, so need the clean lines of division. I even use 2 separate laptops. The one constant is my muse – Kali, @adventurespaniel

Coffee or tea…or something else?

Tea…or wine!

Music? Or do you prefer to work in silence?

I create playlists – or mixed tapes – for each project I work on. This really helps with re-writes. When I’m writing, though, I pop my headphones on and play anything from the classics to indie songwriters.

What are you working on right now?

The I Want You Back trilogy. I’m about to start the re-write and can’t wait to get stuck back into it.

Why I’m an indie author…

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I gave my mother a copy of Wish You Were Here for Christmas. There’s something quite confronting about your mother reading a story where the occasional swear word is uttered and sex happens.

It reminds me of the story when my brother was really young and we were on the farm just outside of Bombala (in southern NSW) helping with the lamb marking. If you don’t know what lamb marking is, I’ll explain sometime much later. Anyways, my brother was wrestling this lamb that was almost as big as him – it was one of the early born lambs that season – and he said ‘F’n hell, you’re an idiot, lamb!’

We all went silent. Ummmmm aaaaaah.

Tearfully, my brother apologised, ‘I’m sorry Mum – I didn’t mean to say idiot!’

Given that Mum’s reaction to my potty mouth is usually something like, ‘ you’re better educated that that, Joanne,’ it’s fair to say I was concerned that Mum was reading my book. I even joked about redacting the spicy bits. As one of my sisters said, I can’t believe you used the word “cock”.’ Really? What else was I going to call it. Hi Leese…

As it turns out, Mum loved the book and said the sex was nicely done. I’m not sure whether that’s a good or a bad thing…in fact, I don’t want to know. I was, however, thrilled that she liked it – and was prepared to tell all of her friends that she liked it. She asked me, though, why I’d decided to self publish this book. ‘Surely it’s good enough to be published, Joanne,’ she said.

Yeah, I think it is – which is why I published it.

The thing is, after I self published Baby, It’s You, I made the decision to continue to self publish. I’m still not making a living – or anywhere near a living – from my books, but I’m proud of them, and I’m proud to be an indie author. It’s what I want to continue to do.

Why did I go indie in the first place?

I’d sent Baby, It’s You off to a few publishers. It got through the slush pile with one – who asked to see the first three chapters. Then three months later they asked to see the whole book – and requested that I not show anyone else while they were deliberating. Three months later the answer came back: sorry, like the story, like the voice, but not enough romance for us.

Disappointed, I repeated the process. Can we see the first three chapters. Sure. Three months later: we’d like to see the rest of the book – you’re not showing anyone else are you? After six months I got the same result: sorry, like the story, like the voice, but too much romance for us.

At that point I figured that if it was good enough to get through the slush piles and good enough to be considered for acquisition, the bones of a good story were there. It was then that I decided that I was tired of waiting. It was then that I decided that it was time to back myself and take control of the process.

What happened next?

A lot of research.

I sat down and worked out what it was that a traditional publisher would do. They’d hire a structural editor, a copy editor, a cover designer, and there’d be someone to do marketing and promotions. At least.

So that’s what I set out to do. Hire the same people that a traditional publisher would hire. Except for the marketing part – although, I’ve since done that too.

That means an investment?

Absolutely. Publishing costs money – especially if you want your book to be the best version of itself that it can be. When you’re publishing independently, you’re making the investment that a publisher would normally be making for you and in you. You’re also reaping a larger proportion of the royalties – assuming, that is, that you’ve done your marketing and sell books outside your immediate circle of friends.

If you’re with a traditional publisher, they hire the editors, organise the cover, and do your marketing (although many first time authors have been disappointed with the amount of marketing they’ve had to do for themselves). If you’re lucky you’ll be paid a small advance, and will be paid a portion of the royalties once their investment has been repaid. It’s basic business common-sense. If you’re successful, you have the support of the publisher for your next venture, and your next, and the one after that.

So why self-publish then? Surely it’s better to have someone do all of that for you?

The easy answer would be to admit that I’m a control freak. The longer answer is that as much as I love the creative process, I really enjoy the business of writing –  and I’m prepared to make an investment in my business.

I’m in this for the long haul, so the team I’m building around me is one I trust to help me achieve my publishing goals and to help me be a better writer.

Do I secretly yearn for a publishing contract?

Man, yes! Especially when I get great feedback about the books, but the sales remain slow – even though they are improving with each release. Would I go out looking for a publisher? Not at the moment – but I wouldn’t rule out doing that in the future. At this point I’m enjoying being the CEO of my writing career, although there’s no denying that I’d love to one day see my books in an airport – and have the instagram to prove it.

Can you keep the costs down by skimping on an editor and doing your own cover design?

In theory, yes, but would a traditional publisher skimp on an editor or a cover designer? No, they wouldn’t. And when you’re an indie, you’re your own publishing house. Just saying.

Is indie publishing for everyone?

No. You need to be prepared to be responsible for your business, treat your creative output as the product or assets of your business, and manage it in the same way as a traditional publisher would.

If you want to simply create and leave the business to someone else, then indie publishing is not for you.

Why I pay for stock photos…

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The image I purchased for Big Girls Don’t Cry

You know how I told you the other day about how I’m in the middle of the cover design process? It occurred to me that there was one aspect I didn’t talk too much about: images- not just what to use, but whether they can be used.

I’m a creative, and don’t give my work away for free- although reserve the right to do so if I choose. That’s why I pay for every photo that I use on my blogs- unless it’s a photo that I’ve taken myself (most on and anyways are my own images).

There are plenty of stock photo companies out there with image packages available. I’ve purchased image packs from Shutterstock, istock and Dreamstime in the past, but now mostly use Deposit Photos.

I sign up to appsumo and wait for their annual offer on deposit photos image packs. Last time I bought three packs of 100 images for around $100 in total. It’s worth signing up and keeping an eye out for the specials. There’s no timeframe within which you need to download the images, and they look better than the photos I take.

The thing is, most images you purchase will be licensed for particular purposes. Deposit Photos do a great job of showing what’s allowed under a standard license and what you must buy an extended license for. In short, if you intend you use the image to make money, you probably should be buying the extended license- although I’m not a lawyer, so please do your own research and seek your own advice.

When it comes to book covers, it’s all a tad confusing. One line states that a standard license is sufficient for a book cover, but further down it also states that an extended license is required for ebooks that are offered for resale or distribution.

As I said before, I’m not a lawyer (so naturally nothing in this post is intended to be used as legal advice), so when it comes to images I intend using on my covers, I play it safe and but the extended license. It costs more (I paid $89 for the extended license for the image I used on Big Girls Don’t Cry, and prices do vary) but I know I have the rights to use it- and that peace of mind is worth the extra expense. Besides, I know that I’m helping another creative pay their bills- and as creatives, that’s what we all aspire to.

How to choose a cover design…

Path through bluebell woods in early morning sunrise

Wish You Were Here is now safely off being copy edited- which means I need to think about all the other millions of tasks that need to be completed in order to get it onto the virtual bookshelves at the end of October. Highest on that list is the cover.

I’ve developed a good relationship with the freelance designer I used for Baby, It’s You and Big Girls Don’t Cry, but Wish You Were Here is different- we’re going almost immediately to print on demand with this one- as well as all digital platforms- so there are different specifications required for the cover. For starters, she’ll need to design a back cover, and a spine, as well as a front cover that will look great as a thumbnail. Also, the print version of the cover won’t be able to be nailed down until the file is converted and we know how many pages there will be. Yep, I agree- it all sounds a tad too hard.Big Girls Don't Cry

So, what do I tell my designer? As much as I can. The more information she knows about the book, the genre, the location, the themes, the characters, the better. The basic specs are relatively easy:

  • Title: Wish You Were Here
  • Author: Joanne Tracey
  • Tagline: yet to be determined
  • Notes on text: Please use same fonts as on Big Girls, but switch the size so my name is larger than the title this time.
  • Front cover to be 2500 pixels tall, 1563 pixels wide and no more than 2MB.

As for the rest, I’m after a cover that’s in a similar style and theme to Big Girls Don’t Cry. I want it to have the same sense of place. Where I used one of my own photos in the cover for Big Girls (a Balinese rice field), I can’t for Wish You Were Here. The book is largely set in a fictional village named Brookford in The Cotswolds.

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Early morning view looking across to Chalford

Brookford could be an amalgam of any of the villages we visited when we were over there last year, but it’s somewhere near Cirencester and Stroud, close to Sapperton and Frampton Mansell.

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Broadway

I tried to take some photos of the landscape in and around the farmhouse we stayed out just outside of Chalford- and some of the cottages- but the light was so dull and flat, that none of my pictures are usable as high res images. I wanted that soft light that warms the yellow of the Cotswold stone- on both the houses and the stone walls.  I need the light to show promise and the potential of a happy ending.

As a result, I suspect I’ll need to purchase extended licence stock photos instead. But again, of what? There’s a pivotal and emotional scene set in a bluebell wood that I’d like to capture the moment and mood of…

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Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown

The book is also partly set in Queenstown- a place where I have plenty of great landscape shots- all in good light- yet, that’s only part of the story and this is contemporary women’s fiction- not travel.

Like I did last time , I went searching for covers- what else is out there? What’s been winning the contests? What’s coming up on my Amazon searches? What can I pin to my pinterest covers board? (If you want to know how else I use pinterest in my writing, check out this post).

I googled the top contemporary romance books on Amazon and saw absolutely nothing that I ended up pinning. I checked out last year’s winners  of the Romance Australia cover contests and pinned a couple. Tears of the Cheetah won best romantic suspense cover. It’s a lovely cover, but it tells me nothing about the book or genre other than where it’s set. It could be a travel book. Luna Tango won the contemporary category. I love everything about that cover. This year’s winners are here.

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Next up was best-selling Aussie contemporary writers. I liked Rachel John’s covers, but again, didn’t get that sense of place I was after. The ones who do that best are the rural romance girls. The majority of covers I pinned were in that genre.

One thing, though, they all had in common was a picture of a person- or persons. I get that this immediately tells the reader that there are romantic elements within, but it causes me even more indecision.

In a not very scientific poll, I asked the question of Facebook and Twitter friends: do you like people on the front of your books? Generally the answer was no, yet there is virtually nothing on the romance shelves that doesn’t have a picture of either the gorgeous guy, the thoughtful heroine, or the happy couple. People say it turns them off, yet this is what readers seem to be buying.

Escape Publishing, in particular, have a thing about showing full faces (see Evan and Darcy on the pinboard), Momentum (for Pan Macmillan) do the same (see The Peppercorn Project on the pinboard). It obviously works for them, but do I want to put a pre-conceived picture of Max and Richie into my reader’s minds? I’m not sure about that.

The other questions Jacinda usually asks  in order to get a feel for the story and the design are:

  • What are some of the most powerful/ important scenes/ ideas of the book?
  • What feeling are you trying to get across in the book? (Name 3 emotions you would describe your book as)
  • Is there an item or concept that is thematic in the piece?
  • What’s your target market?

As for the answers to these? Well, that would be too much of a spoiler alert!

Sunrise near Frampton Mansell
Sunrise near Frampton Mansell

What To Expect From A Copy Edit…

closeup of a pencil eraser correcting an error

Wish You Were Here is about as done in the structural editing stakes as it can be. I’m doing a final pass through for the big stuff and then it’s off for copy edit. I’m also sending it off to my beta (or first) readers at this time too.

I remember when I first got the copy edit back for Baby, It’s You. It was terrifying- this marked-up document full of deletions and comments. The page was full of them. Every page was full of them. I started to sweat. Seriously.

As I plodded through the first chapter though, it got easier. Most were minor grammar and punctuation changes- commas instead of semi colons, quotation marks the wrong way round (something scrivener tends to do for conversations where the sentence starts with S) that I hadn’t picked up on. Others were style changes to keep things consistent. Some were comments with suggestions to tighten the words.

It’s a detail and consistency thing- and I’m the first to confess that I’m crap at both detail and consistency.

When it came time for Big Girls Don’t Cry to come under the attention of the track change equivalent of the red pencil, I had a better idea of what to expect.

So, what exactly is a copy edit? The difference between them is a trees and forest thing. In a structural edit, the forest is of interest; in a copy edit, it’s the trees.  A structural edit looks at the big picture: plot and flow and characterisation etc. A copy edit, however, is about detail, style and consistency.

In a copy edit, the editor will go word-by-word, line-by-line, page-by-page through the manuscript,  looking critically for errors, issues, typos, clarity, repetition, cheesiness etc. As an example, at one point in Big Girls my leading lady, Abby, says something like ‘I had plenty of leave up my sleeve.’ Really Jo? Really? I’d completely missed it.

Then there’s the pacing and clarity thing- a tiny rearrangement of words can sometimes make a whole sentence read so much better. Occasionally, Nicola will suggest a change: ‘re-worded, edit ok?’ – at other times she’d leave a comment: ‘I think this sentence needs work.’ It’s about placing the words in the location and order where they will be of the most service.

Putting all of this together, the process of copy editing is time consuming- and that’s why it’s also the most expensive part of the self-publishing process. If you’re even half as detail-challenged as I am, it’s also a step that you can’t afford to miss- especially if you’re an indie author.

As an aside, I was reading a book the other day- traditionally published, where I counted no few than around six errors- jarring errors. Ironically, one was in a chapter about editing. The book was beyond fabulous, and I forgive easily, but given the money that traditional publishers have for editing and proofreading, it’s also not a good look.*

I use the same editor- Nicola from ebookedit– for the copy process as well as structural editing- but you don’t have to. I do- partly because I’m lazy and don’t have the time to go out and look for another editor and go through the whole getting to know you and your work business. Mostly though, it’s because she “gets” what I’m trying to do, the story I’m telling, and she understands my voice- and that is invaluable.

Because most editors charge by the hour, you can make it cheaper by ensuring that your work is as clean as it possibly can be before it goes out. Ebookedit have some suggestions to help you through this. The link is here.

If you’re working with someone for the first time, most editors will ask you for a sample of your writing so that they can quote you an approximate figure. Some will set a maximum price, some will not. Before signing the contract with your editor, make sure that you know (and have budgeted) for the maximum charge.

Check also whether your editor is doing one pass or two of the document- it does make a difference to the cost. If your manuscript is non-fiction, there could be a lot of fact checking required- in addition to the grammar, spelling, style etc. A second pass will pick up the details missed on the first round.

When she was working on Baby, It’s You, before proceeding too far down the track, Nicola sent me a sample chapter she’d edited- just to ensure that I was ok with the style and method she was using. I was. This step wasn’t necessary for Big Girls Don’t Cry.

A lot of authors will say that the best way to copy edit is by printing out the manuscript and going through it manually. This doesn’t work so well for me- I like to work straight from a document with all the changes marked up. I can then deal with each change in order. The whole idea of a red pencil and a manuscript is evocative, but not practical for me. You could be different. My point? Check how your edit will be done, and the method by which it will be returned.

What’s next?

While Wish You Were Here is off being copy edited, I’ll work on the cover. I have some ideas to send the designer, but more on that next time.

*If this post contains typos or grammatical errors, please see this as a reason why I invest in a good editor!

 

Pinterest for writers- how to make it work for you

Pinterest For WritersI’m about two-thirds of the way through the current re-write for Wish You Were Here. All going well it will be done next weekend and off to Nicola at ebookedit for copy editing at the end of the month. Yes, we’re nearly there.

As I’ve mentioned before, this story is about movement, and it covers a lot of physical territory- some places that I’ve seen and taken inspiration from, and some I haven’t been fortunate enough to visit myself.

That’s where pinterest comes in handy. Pinterest? Get off the internet and keep writing, I hear you say. The thing is, it’s not all about procrastinating…truly…

I’m yet to fully explore pinterest as a method for growing my list or my readership (although this post will be my go-to when I do…) but I do use it as a pinboard or ideas board as idea triggers for when I write. It helps to fill the gaps, to add the layers.

I pin pictures of locations, houses, outfits, pubs, foods, tracks…you name it. Essentially I pin anything that my protagonist might do, the places that she might go, things that she might see, and looks that she might wear. It helps me picture places that I’ve never been- or didn’t take enough notice of when I was there. For those places I have visited, the pins show me what they might look like in other seasons.

In the early days of Wish You Were Here , I also pinned pictures of celebrities that I thought could be inspirations for Max and Richie- so that I’d start with a picture in my head of how they looked, the way they smiled. As I got to know them better, I took those pins down- partly because I didn’t want to feel tied to these images, but also because I didn’t want anyone else to have a pre-conceived notion of who Max and Richie are.

Without giving too much away, here’s the link to my board for Wish You Were Here…make of it what you will. The bluebells in the main pic in this post represent a major scene in the story.

Over the next few weeks I’ll create another board- inspiration for my cover art…naturally I’ll share that with you too…

As for the actual locations I’ve used? I’ll tell you about those sometime soon…

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